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Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> there are restraints. >> we're going to be debating -- >> in the pentagon and the cia. >> i mean, his little deputies are over there telling him what he can and can't do? >> this is going to be an ongoing debate in this program, there's no question about it. this is a whole new world. exit question. the united nations human rights council is now examining drone strikes. if some or all of anti- terrorist drone use is found to constitute war crimes, and the u.n. rules the matter to the icc, which is the u.n.'s international criminal court, will president obama be able to travel overseas for the rest of his life without fearing ending up in the icc docket? >> you shoe tell the icc to mind its own business but we should have the congress of the united states and the leaders of the united states debate this issue and set rules of engagement we can all agree upon and follow. >> point is well taken. stop trying to sweep this under the rug. >> let's put it up-front. >> eleanor. >> these are valid questions, and they were debated in the hearing for the confirmation of john brennan this week. it is how a democ
, if you will. we do have an opportunity to talk to several people within the pentagon and what we found we were very disappointed by was that they weren't taking the steps that they really needed to take to address this problem. >> brown: is this for you an act of... is it journalism? is it art? i mean it's film making. how do you see what your doing? >> well, i guess i see myself as an artist. but as an artist i think you take on the greatest challenge you can. to put all these things together, the art, film making, journalism into one, i see it as an artistic enterprise but at the same time, of course, when you're dealing with this kind of subject, you have to be very journalistically precise which we were. but it's a challenge. i mean this film was being made actually for two audiences. one was for the film making audience. it's been very successful. it was nominated for academy award. it's won many audience awards but it was also made for policy makers in washington d.c. >> brown: you had them in mind absolutely. i remember cut by cut we'd be thinking, this will play to an audience but
deal logical issue this is about safety and efficiency. the pentagon is behind the reductions. you want a smaller nuclear arsenal that you can be confident will work. >> countries okay you off. countries with the bomb. the u.s., russia, britain, france, china, india, pakistan, israel, north korea. countries believed to be seeking the bomb, iran,ee p egypt, nigeria, syria, taiwan. officially given up to pssing or developing the bomb, south africa, argentina, brazil, kazakhstan, belarus, ukraine, libya. >> you want to correct that buchanan? >> i don't think there are any active programs in any of those countries you are talking about except possibly iran. i don't think egypt, i don't think they have nuclear programs at all. and south africa gave up an actual nuclear weapon. libya gave up what they had inside that mountain which juan working that well. >> do you want to speak to anything? particularly iran? >> iran is going to be i just came back from the middle east, iran is going to be the issue for that part of the world. nobody is comfortable with what iran is doing at this stage of t
, the agencies, primarily the pentagon and the c.i.a. nominate people to be on the list. and it goes through what the white house promises is a very rigorous process of review to determine if those people should or should not be on the list. we don't know exactly what the standard is. but it involves a number of criteria, including whether the host country, the country in which this person, particular person is cooperative or not vis-À-vis capturing the person. in any event, they have a standard. names are nominated. it goes through an interagency process. and finally it makes it to the president. and he makes the final decision who is or is not on the list. does that sound like what you understand? >> i think that's certainly what the government has said happens. and, of course, this is the problem is that the only thing that we ever know about the counterintelligence stuff over the last 10 or 11 years has been, you know, what the government has been forced to say, what journalists have been able to find out, or what human rights organizations like ours have been able to find out on the ground.
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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